Benefits & Research

Benefits & Research

There is a growing body of research and studies showing the tangible benefits of massage therapy for your mental and physical health. This page is updated frequently, so check back often.

Chronic Pain in the Neck

Posted by on Jun 4, 2012 in Benefits & Research | 0 comments

Chronic Pain in the Neck

Massage therapy is proven to be effective on neck pain.  The following linked study (NCCAM-funded, performed in Seattle, WA) compares general improvement, medication use,  and other functional and “bothersomeness” metrics among two groups–one group was given a book on self-care, the other group received therapeutic massage treatment. The results are significant: After 10 weeks, the massage group was more likely than the self-care-book group to have clinically significant improvement in function and symptoms. At 26 weeks,...

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Concurrent Physical and Psychological Healing; Massage Therapy Addresses the Whole Person

Posted by on May 20, 2012 in Benefits & Research | 0 comments

Concurrent Physical and Psychological Healing;  Massage Therapy Addresses the Whole Person

“Touch is often the most neglected or assaulted sense of the hospitalized patient”. Integrating massage therapy into a hospital setting shows how effective it is for not only treating physical pain, but how– on deeper physical, mental, and emotional levels–it not only treats injury, but treats and respects the patient as a whole, complex human being. From a marked improvement in the ability to rest (sleep) and thus promote speedy recovery, to much needed relief from acute physical pain, soreness–even to the extent...

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Massage Shown to Decrease Muscular Pain by 25% to 50%.

Posted by on Apr 27, 2012 in Benefits & Research | 0 comments

Massage Shown to Decrease Muscular Pain by 25% to 50%.

Massage therapy is commonly used to alleviate muscle pain, with or without muscle inflammation.  A study published in the Journal of Pain (done by researchers at University of Iowa), however, conclusively demonstrates that deep-tissue massage can reduce musculoskeletal pain associated with exercise, specifically pain experienced after unaccustomed exercise in otherwise healthy adults. The double-blind, randomized controlled trial consisted of subjects divided into three groups–those who received no massage (the control group); those who...

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The Effects of Neuromuscular Therapy on Parkinson’s Disease

Posted by on Mar 27, 2012 in Benefits & Research | 0 comments

Controlled pilot study of the effects of neuromuscular therapy in patients with Parkinson’s disease. Mov. Disord. 2006 (12):2127-33 Lauren H Craig, Anna Svircev, Michael Haber, Jorge L Juncos The objectives of this study is to examine the effects of neuromuscular therapy (NMT) on motor and nonmotor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Thirty-six subjects with PD were randomly assigned to NMT or music relaxation (MR, or active control). Subjects received treatment twice a week for 4 weeks. Testing was conducted at baseline, after...

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Randomized Controlled Trials of Pediatric Massage

Posted by on Mar 27, 2012 in Benefits & Research | 0 comments

Randomized controlled trials of pediatric massage: a review. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med 2007 (1):23-34 Shay Beider, Christopher A Moyer The existing reviews of massage therapy (MT) research are either limited to infants, adults, or were conducted prior to the publication of the most recent studies using pediatric samples. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of pediatric MT are reviewed. A literature search yielded 24 RCTs of pediatric MT, defined as the manual manipulation of soft tissue intended to promote health and well-being in...

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Massage effectively reduces DOMS by 30%

Posted by on Mar 27, 2012 in Benefits & Research | 0 comments

CONTEXT: Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) describes muscle pain and tenderness that typically develop several hours postexercise and consist of predominantly eccentric muscle actions, especially if the exercise is unfamiliar. Although DOMS is likely a symptom of eccentric-exercise-induced muscle damage, it does not necessarily reflect muscle damage. Some prophylactic or therapeutic modalities may be effective only for alleviating DOMS, whereas others may enhance recovery of muscle function without affecting DOMS. OBJECTIVE: To test the...

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Massage and delayed onset muscle soreness

Posted by on Mar 27, 2012 in Benefits & Research | 0 comments

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to investigate the physiological and psychological effects of massage on delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). METHODS: Eighteen volunteers were randomly assigned to either a massage or control group. DOMS was induced with six sets of eight maximal eccentric contractions of the right hamstring, which were followed 2 h later by 20 min of massage or sham massage (control). Peak torque and mood were assessed at 2, 6, 24, and 48 h postexercise. Range of motion (ROM) and intensity and unpleasantness of...

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The prevention and treatment of exercise-induced muscle damage.

Posted by on Mar 27, 2012 in Benefits & Research | 0 comments

Abstract Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) can be caused by novel or unaccustomed exercise and results in a temporary decrease in muscle force production, a rise in passive tension, increased muscle soreness and swelling, and an increase in intramuscular proteins in blood. Consequently, EIMD can have a profound effect on the ability to perform subsequent bouts of exercise and therefore adhere to an exercise training program. A variety of interventions have been used prophylactically and/or therapeutically in an attempt to reduce the...

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Neurological effects of transverse friction massage on the flexor carpi radialis.

Posted by on Mar 27, 2012 in Benefits & Research | 0 comments

Abstract The purpose of the study was to determine the effects of transverse friction massage (TFM) on flexor carpi radialis (FCR) motoneuron (MN) pool excitability. Twenty-eight healthy subjects were randomly assigned into massage and control groups. Pre- vs post-TFM H-reflex data were collected. Controls received a rest period instead of massage. Massage dose was standardized by a novel electronic method which recorded the massage rate, momentary pressure and total cumulative pressure (energy). Two-way ANOVA of H/M ratios derived from...

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Massage effects cortisol, serotonin and dopamine levels

Posted by on Mar 27, 2012 in Benefits & Research | 0 comments

Cortisol decreases, serotonin and dopamine increase following massage therapy. Int J Neurosci. 2005 Oct;115(10):1397-413. Field T, Hernandez-Reif M, Diego M, Schanberg S, Kuhn C.  Touch Research Institutes, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida In this article the positive effects of massage therapy on biochemistry are reviewed including decreased levels of cortisol and increased levels of serotonin and dopamine. In studies in which cortisol was assayed either in saliva or in urine, significant decreases were noted in...

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